San Joaquin: Court rules St. John’s belongs to the Episcopal…

first_img [Episcopal News Service] A California Superior Court has ruled that the 160-year-old landmark St. John the Evangelist Church in downtown Stockton, California, is to be used for the mission of the Episcopal Church.In issuing the April 2 ruling, Stockton Superior Court Judge Roger Ross granted the Diocese of San Joaquin‘s motion for summary judgment, agreeing with previous court rulings that “all the parish assets and parish premises are held for the ministry and mission of the church and the diocese” and the wider church.Once the individuals of St. John’s former vestry left the Episcopal Church and the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin, they “ceased to be the directors and officers of, and could no longer represent or otherwise act on behalf of the parish corporation, and as a result had no authority to act on behalf of the parish corporation,” according to the decision.San Joaquin Bishop Provisional David Rice said, “I join with Episcopalians throughout San Joaquin in looking forward to exploring the ways in which St. John’s, Stockton can continue to be a center of celebration and place from which God’s mission is evident.“We believe St. John’s provides a marvelous opportunity to become a place of reconciliation and again, given its context, a downtown center for much needed urban ministry. We also look forward to seeking ways in which we might welcome any parishioners to remain.”St. John’s was established as a congregation in 1854 and is a landmark church in downtown Stockton. Located at 316 N. Dorado St., its assets include commercial property.It is the latest church property to be returned to the Episcopal Diocese of San Joaquin since theological differences purportedly split the diocese in 2007. Those differences resulted in legal cases concerning church properties still held by former members.Altogether, other properties in Ridgecrest (St. Michael’s), Turlock (St. Francis), Bakersfield (St. Paul’), Delano (Hope and Redeemer) and Sonora (St. James) have also returned to the Episcopal Church. Another church property, St. Paul’s, Modesto was returned July 1, 2009 prior to litigation.State and federal courts have consistently ruled that church properties are held in trust by the diocese for the mission and ministry of the wider Episcopal Church and that while dissenting members may leave, they cannot take property with them, according to Michael Glass, diocesan chancellor.Other disputed properties are in various stages of litigation, Glass said.–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles.  Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Associate Rector Columbus, GA April 22, 2014 at 4:12 pm This is a good news story if ever there was one. However, minorStumbling blocks still exit. One of these blocksIs the extended time it has taken to get this farHampered those now and always were EpiscopalianIf it is the diocesan gain/objective why does the dioceseOf San Joaquin not have a facilities plan in place andSubject to transparency. A well thought out facilities planIs critical for the long term health of the diocese of San Joaquin. By Pat McCaughanPosted Apr 14, 2014 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET George Swanson says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab April 27, 2014 at 1:47 pm I think regarding property, money and people, Jewish financial advisor Suzie Orman places“People first, then Money (power) then Things (e..g. property, for example).” Anglicans and Episcopalians could hear voices outside the Christian tradition and courtroom for some wisdom. San Joaquin: Court rules St. John’s belongs to the Episcopal Church Property Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 center_img Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Ted Thomas Martin says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Comments are closed. Francis Remkiewicz says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Selena Smith says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH April 14, 2014 at 10:37 pm I hope that St. Philip’s Church in Coalinga will welcome the Episcopal Church again. G-d bless all the people there. Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY April 17, 2014 at 3:36 pm The US Supreme Court has said “Corporations” ARE people. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Comments (4) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

CCTV cameras may be installed at historic Lifford church

first_img Facebook Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Previous articleDerry were always in control of the game – Kenny ShielsNext articleRoss defends “Drink Link” plans News Highland Google+ Twitter FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th CCTV cameras may be installed at historic Lifford church The Church of Ireland is considering installing CCTV cameras outsisde St Lugadius Church in Lifford as a result of what’s been described as growing incidents of anti social behaviour around the church grounds.During a serious incident in 2012, the church was broken into and an attempt was made to set it alight.The Dean of Raphoe, Very Reverend Arthur Barrett, says the priority is to ensure that there isn’t an escalation of the problem.He was speaking on the Nine ’til Noon Show………..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/lugadius.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Facebook Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 center_img Pinterest By News Highland – May 8, 2018 WhatsApp Twitter WhatsApp AudioHomepage BannerNews Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Harps come back to win in Waterford RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterestlast_img read more

Zoning Board hypocrisy

first_imgSARA FLOUNDERS To the Editor:The bigoted, offensive actions at the Bayonne Zoning Board Hearings should be denounced, not sugar coated as an issue of parking spaces. This hypocritically masks the real issue of anti-Muslim bigotry.There are 45 churches in Bayonne. None have parking spaces for all who attend Sunday services. There are over 100 restaurants in Bayonne and hundreds of other establishments. Most don’t have parking for everyone who comes in the door. This exposes the bias and the double standard.The conduct of the Zoning Board Chair Mark Urban was flagrantly one-sided in all 3 hearings. Although the hearing was public, held at a public school, and the Bill of Rights is still in force, at Urban’s directive, even small paper signs of support and welcome to the Islamic Center were confiscated from the audience.Mayor Jimmy Davis declared that he “is glad that religion and race did not appear to be part of the board’s decision.” Actions speak louder than empty hopes. Mayor Davis is responsible for appointing this unrepresentative, unelected Zoning Board. Change the Board! Let’s show solidarity with our Muslim sisters and brothers who are under attack.last_img read more

Harvard College Professors named

first_imgTheir work ranges from understanding the cellular processes inhibited by antibiotics to the challenges of religious pluralism in a multi-religious society to the design of distributed open computer networks, but the five faculty members awarded Harvard College Professorships this week have one thing in common: their dedication to educating undergraduate students and helping them develop their intellectual passions.The five, Fredric Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society and Master of Lowell House Diana Eck, Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory Jorie Graham, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Daniel Kahne, David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History Jill Lepore, and Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science David Parkes, were named to the prestigious professorships on April 26 by Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Dean Michael D. Smith.“First and foremost, Harvard is an institution dedicated to educating the next generation of leaders,” Smith said. “It is a pleasure to recognize Daniel Kahne, David Parkes, Jill Lepore, Jorie Graham, and Diana Eck, who are not only stars in their chosen fields, but true innovators in their teaching, dedicated to the sort of student engagement that has come to characterize the Harvard College experience.”The professorships are one of a number of recent efforts aimed at underscoring the exceptional teaching that takes place in Harvard’s classrooms.Earlier this year, FAS launched the Great Teachers video series to highlight exceptional FAS faculty members, while last year saw the creation of [email protected], a series of faculty panels in which participants shared best practices and innovative methods with fellow faculty and teaching staff.Complementing those efforts was the University-wide Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT) symposium held Feb. 3. The conference offered faculty and students the opportunity to engage in dialogue and debate, while sharing ideas and information about pedagogical innovation, and was developed as part of a $40 million gift from Rita E. and Gustave M. Hauser.“Harvard has long been recognized as a leader in the world of scholarship, but it is also an institution of exceptional teachers,” Smith said. “Harvard College Professorships are just one of the ways we recognize great teaching at Harvard.”The Harvard College Professorships are five-year appointments, begun in 1997 through a gift of John and Frances Loeb. They provide faculty with extra support for research or scholarly activities, a semester of paid leave or summer salary.Each recipient said he or she was honored to receive the recognition, and all said their time in Harvard’s classrooms has been as much about learning as teaching.Diana EckAlthough she hasn’t yet considered how the Harvard College Professorship will impact her time in the classroom, Eck said her teaching is constantly evolving in response to the digital revolution, and the wealth of information it puts at students’ fingertips.“My teaching has changed a great deal — images, visual arts, music, YouTube selections — all are so much easier to access, both in class and in student research,” she said. ????My research project, the Pluralism Project, has been developing Web-based tools for teaching for the past 20 years, including, most recently, layered Google maps on religious diversity of 20 American cities.”Eck has also taken the unique approach of using the case study model pioneered at the Harvard Business School by applying it to religious dilemmas in contemporary America.“I actually think this is the best teaching I have done at Harvard,” she said. “I learn a lot when developing lectures, and love doing it, but I’m trying to move away from that, so students can engage more in the classroom experience.”While she has long seen the utility of bringing the digital world into the classroom, Eck said there is often no substitute for the value of face-to-face learning and experience.“In some of my teaching, such as in my class ‘World Religions in Boston,’ I want students to move outside the Harvard classroom and explore the religious communities of the region,” she said. “With the help of our website on the religious communities of greater Boston, students can do more than read about Islam, Sikism, or Buddhism — they have living communities close enough to visit. Crossing the threshold of our immediate experience to become a guest in someone else’s religious community is a learning experience in itself.”Jorie GrahamThough it’s continually challenging, Graham said the experience of being in a Harvard classroom is one she finds immensely rewarding.“I find teaching to be spiritually and emotionally draining as well as nourishing,” she said. “I feel tested by each encounter — so much is at stake! And I come to deeply admire and cherish my students. It is a commonplace, but I do indeed learn so much from them.“My approach to teaching is simple: I have never taught any class before,” Graham continued. “We reinvent the wheel each semester. The information we transfer back and forth, and handle, and tear into, and reconstitute, and add to — is in many ways the excuse that permits us to get closer to that knowledge which eludes us individually but which we can often reach as a community. I profoundly trust the discoveries made by the community of the class.”While Graham said she is happy to receive the recognition that comes with a Harvard College Professorship, she said that the “victory” of seeing her students’ lives and work flourish is a communal effort that stretches far beyond the bounds of the classroom.“[This award] makes me feel all the extra hours are not invisible — a good feeling — though of course I would not do things any differently were it not acknowledged,” said Graham. “It does, sweetly, in its way of singling one out even to one’s self, make one feel, to mangle Yeats’ words, that all “our stitching and unstitching has not been naught.” Though no award could give me the feeling I get from watching my students’ lives and work flourish and astonish. And that, of course, is never the outcome of one teacher’s work — all our victories are communal efforts — starting with the Admissions Office!”Daniel KahneFor Kahne, teaching at Harvard has — literally — been a learning experience.One of several professors who teach Life Sciences 1a, an interdisciplinary course that includes faculty from chemistry and chemical biology, biology, and molecular and cellular biology, Kahne said his colleagues have served as role models for his own teaching.“Since coming to Harvard, I have seen that there are some incredibly talented teachers here,” he said. “There are many faculty members here for whom it seems effortless, and it has been a tremendous learning experience to work with them and to see them in the classroom.”For students, Kahne said, the course’s multifaceted approach is designed to highlight a concept they may not normally associate with the sciences: that there may not be one single answer to a question, but multiple ways to approach it.“Certainly, it’s easier for people to recognize that, if you read a piece of literature, there could be multiple ways to interpret it,” he said. “In the sciences, we’d like to teach it as though it’s objective and there is a single answer that is knowable, but in fact things can be quite variable, depending on your perspective.”Jill M. LeporeJust hours before she learned she’d been awarded a professorship, Lepore was leading a seminar class in one of the unlikeliest places on campus: the roof of the Science Center.“Yesterday was my last class of the semester and one of the students in my American Revolution seminar had the brilliant idea that we should hold class there, so we trooped on over,” she said. “Up there, looking out and over the Yard, talking about the meaning of freedom, left me thinking, as I often do, what a delight and an honor it is to teach such astonishing students.”While the digital revolution has profoundly transformed how some subjects are presented in the classroom, Lepore said her approach to teaching is “embarrassingly low-tech.”Often, she said, the best way to understand history is to travel to the places where it was made. By experiencing a location that played witness to history, students can understand the forces that may have driven people a century ago.To give them that experience, Lepore and students in her freshman seminar on Charles Dickens traveled to Lowell to trace the author’s 1842 journey to the city. In her class on the American Revolution, students spend time walking around Boston, “trying to find the 18th-century city that lies hidden within the 21st.”When asked how a Harvard College Professorship will influence her teaching going forward, Lepore joked about a professor in New York who teaches a class on the city’s history — by bicycle.“That sounds to me about the most beautiful use of technology in the classroom I could ever imagine,” she said. “But I’m open to suggestion; in my experience, the students always have the best ideas.”David C. ParkesFor Parkes, the experience of teaching a new class has served as a springboard toward a new textbook on economics and computation, related to algorithmic economics, which he is writing with a former Ph.D. student, Sven Seuken, now on the faculty at the University of Zurich. Being named to a Harvard College Professorship will offer him the chance to extend his current sabbatical into the fall — and complete the book.“This whole enterprise would simply not be possible in the same way without the ability to experience teaching and interacting with such a fantastic body of students,” he said. “I think that we need to remember that what makes Harvard truly great is the strength of our undergraduate body. It is an exciting and rewarding experience to be able to share new ideas, both in terms of the pleasure of teaching new things and the energy and enthusiasm that reflects back from students and motivates me to think about and understand concepts in new ways.”When he returns to the classroom, though, his students can look forward to classes that he strives to make as engaging and interactive as possible.“I encourage students to think actively and ask questions and stop me where there is confusion,” Parkes said. “I teach with a view to everyone in the class being able to understand the material and get something out of the material.It is essential that the faculty of leading universities bring more than just facts and raw knowledge to the classroom,” he added. “We need to work to convey a deeper understanding and a point of view, a mental model with which to understand different concepts and the way that they fit together. I have tried to embrace this in a number of ways: through collaborative mark-up tools for reading class notes in advance so that reading is not an isolated experience for students; Web portals to facilitate posting of notes and questions and for class discussion; and looking to prompt students with questions ahead of class in order to structure my own lecture around the parts of the material that are most interesting or most challenging to students.”last_img read more

Sunman-Dearborn Middle School added to ICE program

first_imgSunman, In. — The Indiana Department of workforce Development has assigned the Sunman-Dearborn Middle School to the Indiana Career Explorer Pilot Program. Sunman-Dearborn Middle School is one of 20 schools in state added to the program this week.Now, eighth-grade students will have access to the Indiana Career Explorer tool to plan, assess and evaluate skills.“A lot of enhancements were added to the ICE tool during the first year of the pilot,” said Beth Meguschar, DWD Associate Chief Operating Officer, Workforce Education and Training. “We are excited for our new pool of pilot schools to be utilizing our improved, school-friendly model to help students make more informed decisions in their career exploration and planning process.”The addition of schools to the program was mandated by lawmakers during the 2018 Indiana General Assembly.last_img read more