Death threats made against the editor of an independent media group

first_imgNews June 7, 2021 Find out more “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says News September 9, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Death threats made against the editor of an independent media group RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan Europe – Central Asia Europe – Central Asia Veran Matic, editor of the media group B 92, has been sent a letter containing death threats against him, members of his family and associates.  He received the letter, signed by „the Serbian Liberation Regiment‰ on 5 September 2005. A similar letter was sent to a member of the student movement, Otpor, Momcilo Veljkovic on 3 September. Matic immediately lodged a complaint with the prosecutor‚s office in Belgrade.Serbian Investment Minister Velimir Ilic and his press adviser Petar Lazovic, publicly issued death threats against Matic at a Belgrade press conference on 15 August this year. to go further – – – – – -Dismay at minister’s insults and threats against journalists 18 August 2005Reporters Without Borders voiced dismay today at the insulting comments which Serbian investment minister Velimir Ilic made to journalists working for the independent media group RTV B92 at a press conference on 15 August. Ilic has a history of such behaviour.”We are appalled at the way the minister and his aide insulted and threatened journalists in public,” the press freedom organisation said. “If politicians react like this to questions they do not want to answer, it shows how fragile press freedom is in Serbia-Montenegro.”B92 reporter Ana Veljkovic asked Ilic about his role in the decision to drop charges against Marko Milosevic – the son of former Yugoslavian president Slobodan Milosevic – who was accused of kidnapping and beating Zoran Milovanovic, a member of an anti-Milosevic youth group, in 2000.Instead of answering the question, Ilic and his press adviser, Petar Lazovic, responded with a torrent of abusive and sexist remarks about Veljkovic. They then turned on all of RTV B92’s journalists, insulting and slandering them and even making death threats. They were especially scathing about the group’s managing director and editor in chief, Veran Matic.Created in 1989, Radio and Television B92 is one of Serbia’s leading independent media groups.Ilic has insulted journalists in the past, often using obscene remarks. On 1 June 2003, when he was mayor of the central city of Cacak, he attacked journalist Vladimir Jesic during an interview broadcast by TV Apolo. Although the TV station filed a complaint, Ilic was not charged. Before that, in 2001, he was accused by breaking the windows of radio Ozone in Cacak.Matic has filed a complaint against Lazovic, Ilic’s press adviser, accusing him of making death threats. RSF_en Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia June 8, 2021 Find out more News News Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts June 4, 2021 Find out more Organisation last_img read more

Harvard College Professors named

first_imgTheir work ranges from understanding the cellular processes inhibited by antibiotics to the challenges of religious pluralism in a multi-religious society to the design of distributed open computer networks, but the five faculty members awarded Harvard College Professorships this week have one thing in common: their dedication to educating undergraduate students and helping them develop their intellectual passions.The five, Fredric Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society and Master of Lowell House Diana Eck, Boylston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory Jorie Graham, Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology and Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology Daniel Kahne, David Woods Kemper ’41 Professor of American History Jill Lepore, and Gordon McKay Professor of Computer Science David Parkes, were named to the prestigious professorships on April 26 by Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Dean Michael D. Smith.“First and foremost, Harvard is an institution dedicated to educating the next generation of leaders,” Smith said. “It is a pleasure to recognize Daniel Kahne, David Parkes, Jill Lepore, Jorie Graham, and Diana Eck, who are not only stars in their chosen fields, but true innovators in their teaching, dedicated to the sort of student engagement that has come to characterize the Harvard College experience.”The professorships are one of a number of recent efforts aimed at underscoring the exceptional teaching that takes place in Harvard’s classrooms.Earlier this year, FAS launched the Great Teachers video series to highlight exceptional FAS faculty members, while last year saw the creation of [email protected], a series of faculty panels in which participants shared best practices and innovative methods with fellow faculty and teaching staff.Complementing those efforts was the University-wide Harvard Initiative for Learning and Teaching (HILT) symposium held Feb. 3. The conference offered faculty and students the opportunity to engage in dialogue and debate, while sharing ideas and information about pedagogical innovation, and was developed as part of a $40 million gift from Rita E. and Gustave M. Hauser.“Harvard has long been recognized as a leader in the world of scholarship, but it is also an institution of exceptional teachers,” Smith said. “Harvard College Professorships are just one of the ways we recognize great teaching at Harvard.”The Harvard College Professorships are five-year appointments, begun in 1997 through a gift of John and Frances Loeb. They provide faculty with extra support for research or scholarly activities, a semester of paid leave or summer salary.Each recipient said he or she was honored to receive the recognition, and all said their time in Harvard’s classrooms has been as much about learning as teaching.Diana EckAlthough she hasn’t yet considered how the Harvard College Professorship will impact her time in the classroom, Eck said her teaching is constantly evolving in response to the digital revolution, and the wealth of information it puts at students’ fingertips.“My teaching has changed a great deal — images, visual arts, music, YouTube selections — all are so much easier to access, both in class and in student research,” she said. ????My research project, the Pluralism Project, has been developing Web-based tools for teaching for the past 20 years, including, most recently, layered Google maps on religious diversity of 20 American cities.”Eck has also taken the unique approach of using the case study model pioneered at the Harvard Business School by applying it to religious dilemmas in contemporary America.“I actually think this is the best teaching I have done at Harvard,” she said. “I learn a lot when developing lectures, and love doing it, but I’m trying to move away from that, so students can engage more in the classroom experience.”While she has long seen the utility of bringing the digital world into the classroom, Eck said there is often no substitute for the value of face-to-face learning and experience.“In some of my teaching, such as in my class ‘World Religions in Boston,’ I want students to move outside the Harvard classroom and explore the religious communities of the region,” she said. “With the help of our website on the religious communities of greater Boston, students can do more than read about Islam, Sikism, or Buddhism — they have living communities close enough to visit. Crossing the threshold of our immediate experience to become a guest in someone else’s religious community is a learning experience in itself.”Jorie GrahamThough it’s continually challenging, Graham said the experience of being in a Harvard classroom is one she finds immensely rewarding.“I find teaching to be spiritually and emotionally draining as well as nourishing,” she said. “I feel tested by each encounter — so much is at stake! And I come to deeply admire and cherish my students. It is a commonplace, but I do indeed learn so much from them.“My approach to teaching is simple: I have never taught any class before,” Graham continued. “We reinvent the wheel each semester. The information we transfer back and forth, and handle, and tear into, and reconstitute, and add to — is in many ways the excuse that permits us to get closer to that knowledge which eludes us individually but which we can often reach as a community. I profoundly trust the discoveries made by the community of the class.”While Graham said she is happy to receive the recognition that comes with a Harvard College Professorship, she said that the “victory” of seeing her students’ lives and work flourish is a communal effort that stretches far beyond the bounds of the classroom.“[This award] makes me feel all the extra hours are not invisible — a good feeling — though of course I would not do things any differently were it not acknowledged,” said Graham. “It does, sweetly, in its way of singling one out even to one’s self, make one feel, to mangle Yeats’ words, that all “our stitching and unstitching has not been naught.” Though no award could give me the feeling I get from watching my students’ lives and work flourish and astonish. And that, of course, is never the outcome of one teacher’s work — all our victories are communal efforts — starting with the Admissions Office!”Daniel KahneFor Kahne, teaching at Harvard has — literally — been a learning experience.One of several professors who teach Life Sciences 1a, an interdisciplinary course that includes faculty from chemistry and chemical biology, biology, and molecular and cellular biology, Kahne said his colleagues have served as role models for his own teaching.“Since coming to Harvard, I have seen that there are some incredibly talented teachers here,” he said. “There are many faculty members here for whom it seems effortless, and it has been a tremendous learning experience to work with them and to see them in the classroom.”For students, Kahne said, the course’s multifaceted approach is designed to highlight a concept they may not normally associate with the sciences: that there may not be one single answer to a question, but multiple ways to approach it.“Certainly, it’s easier for people to recognize that, if you read a piece of literature, there could be multiple ways to interpret it,” he said. “In the sciences, we’d like to teach it as though it’s objective and there is a single answer that is knowable, but in fact things can be quite variable, depending on your perspective.”Jill M. LeporeJust hours before she learned she’d been awarded a professorship, Lepore was leading a seminar class in one of the unlikeliest places on campus: the roof of the Science Center.“Yesterday was my last class of the semester and one of the students in my American Revolution seminar had the brilliant idea that we should hold class there, so we trooped on over,” she said. “Up there, looking out and over the Yard, talking about the meaning of freedom, left me thinking, as I often do, what a delight and an honor it is to teach such astonishing students.”While the digital revolution has profoundly transformed how some subjects are presented in the classroom, Lepore said her approach to teaching is “embarrassingly low-tech.”Often, she said, the best way to understand history is to travel to the places where it was made. By experiencing a location that played witness to history, students can understand the forces that may have driven people a century ago.To give them that experience, Lepore and students in her freshman seminar on Charles Dickens traveled to Lowell to trace the author’s 1842 journey to the city. In her class on the American Revolution, students spend time walking around Boston, “trying to find the 18th-century city that lies hidden within the 21st.”When asked how a Harvard College Professorship will influence her teaching going forward, Lepore joked about a professor in New York who teaches a class on the city’s history — by bicycle.“That sounds to me about the most beautiful use of technology in the classroom I could ever imagine,” she said. “But I’m open to suggestion; in my experience, the students always have the best ideas.”David C. ParkesFor Parkes, the experience of teaching a new class has served as a springboard toward a new textbook on economics and computation, related to algorithmic economics, which he is writing with a former Ph.D. student, Sven Seuken, now on the faculty at the University of Zurich. Being named to a Harvard College Professorship will offer him the chance to extend his current sabbatical into the fall — and complete the book.“This whole enterprise would simply not be possible in the same way without the ability to experience teaching and interacting with such a fantastic body of students,” he said. “I think that we need to remember that what makes Harvard truly great is the strength of our undergraduate body. It is an exciting and rewarding experience to be able to share new ideas, both in terms of the pleasure of teaching new things and the energy and enthusiasm that reflects back from students and motivates me to think about and understand concepts in new ways.”When he returns to the classroom, though, his students can look forward to classes that he strives to make as engaging and interactive as possible.“I encourage students to think actively and ask questions and stop me where there is confusion,” Parkes said. “I teach with a view to everyone in the class being able to understand the material and get something out of the material.It is essential that the faculty of leading universities bring more than just facts and raw knowledge to the classroom,” he added. “We need to work to convey a deeper understanding and a point of view, a mental model with which to understand different concepts and the way that they fit together. I have tried to embrace this in a number of ways: through collaborative mark-up tools for reading class notes in advance so that reading is not an isolated experience for students; Web portals to facilitate posting of notes and questions and for class discussion; and looking to prompt students with questions ahead of class in order to structure my own lecture around the parts of the material that are most interesting or most challenging to students.”last_img read more

Billy Joel Ushers In New Era Of Legendary Music At NYCB Live Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum

first_imgOne of the most highly anticipated concerts on Long Island is finally upon us, which is a triumphant event for many music fans, both young and old alike, for two reasons: its star and its venue.For those who haven’t heard, Long Island resident and legendary musician Billy Joel aka “The Piano Man” will be performing the inaugural concert at the newly renovated Nassau Coliseum, on April 5, ushering in a new era of extraordinary musical performances on the Island!It’s a long-awaited gig, and a long-awaited reopening.The beloved venue—originally opened in 1972 and nicknamed “The Old Barn” in its previous life—has been an integral part of the Island’s entertainment fabric and collective history. It has hosted countless unforgettable performances, be they epic sports battles, or once-in-a-lifetime, for-the-record-books concerts.Basketball legend Julius “Dr. J” Erving led the New York Nets to two ABA Championships at Nassau Coliseum through 1977 before they moved to New Jersey after merging into the NBA. The much-missed New York Islanders NHL hockey team, one of sports’ great dynasties, won four straight Stanley Cups from 1980 to 1983. The Isles were longtime tenants before skating to Brooklyn’s Barclays Center in 2015. Transcendental musical performances have spanned decades and included a vast array of bands and genres, among these: the Grateful Dead, Ray Charles, Duke Ellington, Metallica, Judas Priest, and many, many more.Included on that list is the very last show before the Coliseum shuttered its doors for a $165 million renovation. Who played that noteworthy show? Yup, you guessed it: Billy The Kid!Construction on the new digs actually started the very next day following the Piano Man’s performance, on Aug. 5, 2015. Renamed the NYCB Live Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, the new and improved go-to spot for live sports and musical performances in Nassau County now features high-definition screens, widened concourses, brand-new seats, Long Island-centric concessions, and revamped restrooms, among other amenities. The new venue holds 13,900 seats.That’s just what’s inside. Its outer façade—adorned with reams and reams of aluminum fins to depict our gorgeous dunes along the South Shore—reminds some observers of a spaceship. (X-Files, anyone?) An additional $100 million will go toward further upgrades and development surrounding the state-of-the-art facility.This week’s upcoming spectacular is no exception to the Nassau Coliseum’s history of stellar gigs, and it too will undoubtedly be one to remember!One of the most famous native Long Islanders, Joel will likely lead all those in attendance along a musical journey spanning his storied career, with spectacular renditions of such blockbuster hits as “Scenes From An Italian Restaurant,” “We Didn’t Start The Fire,” “Piano Man,” “An Innocent Man,” “Big Shot,” “The Longest Time,” and, of course, “Nassau State Of Mind”—eh, I mean “New York State Of Mind!”The gig has been sold out, as Joel would say, “For The Longest Time,” but don’t let that stop you from visiting this amazing new concert space and checking out any combination of outstanding music acts coming there throughout the upcoming weeks, months and years!Billy Joel rocks the inaugural gig at the newly renovated NYCB Live Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum on April 5! For more information about this and future shows at the venue, visit nassaucoliseum.comRelated Stories:Billy Joel Gives Nassau Coliseum a Big Shot Closing ConcertNewly Renovated ‘NYCB Live’ Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum UnveiledNassau Coliseum Concert Calendar Booking Up In Advance of Reopening Embed from Getty Images Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

Travelcircus: Demand for Croatia is growing in Germany, Austria and Switzerland

first_imgInterestingly, the data show that this year those who like to travel mostly avoid last-minute vacations. Compared to the previous year, this type of vacation lost an average of 89,93% of searches. City or city break trips also suffer from a drop in interest due to the pandemic, and record a search loss of 77,85%. Austrians also love to relax. With a growth of 30,68% since the summer of 2019, wellness holidays are the number 2 most popular types of holidays in Austria. Third place went to travel to cultural and other attractions, with a growth of 14,5%. Demand for hotels fell, while demand for holiday homes rose by more than half. Focus on active vacation and wellness “The data from the research show that the Austrians showed the greatest demand for domestic travel, which put Austria as the destination in first place in terms of demand. The great news is that Croatia took second place in terms of demand, which is an excellent result in these circumstances, while Germany took third place. It is also important to note that no other country outside the DACH region has recorded a positive increase in holiday demand as Croatia. “, he pointed out Branimir Tončinić, adding that the demand for hotels in the Austrian market has fallen this year, and the demand for accommodation in holiday homes has increased. The volume of hotel searches decreased among Austrians (-18,07%), while accommodation such as holiday homes, apartments and houseboats increased by 13-26%. Holiday homes are the absolute winners, both in this research and on the Croatian market this year. It’s about the results of an online booking platform survey Travelcircus on changes in the travel habits of tourists due to the coronary virus pandemic from the DACH region, ie Germany, Austria and Switzerland.center_img The interest and demand of Germans, Austrians and Swiss for travel to Croatia in 2020 is at least 50 percent higher than the year before, said the director of the Croatian National Tourist Board in Austria Branimir Tončinić.  According to the results of this research, in 2020, interest in travel to Croatia, Germany, Austria and Switzerland increased, while some countries competing with Croatia also performed worse. Namely, in the entire DACH region, interest in Spain and Italy fell by 10 percent, and only in Austria did the demand for Italy, France, the Netherlands, Sweden and Norway fall by more than 30 percent compared to 2019. Guests from Austria this year were more looking for an active holiday. According to the survey, in June and July 2019, Austrians searched an average of 13.835 times for a combination of an “amusement park” and a tourist destination; and in the summer of 2020, there were 23.040 searches of the same search. This corresponds to a growth of 66,53%, and compared to 2017, an impressive 185,68% growth can be seen. The data clearly speaks of a trend that has been growing for years, and now, at the time of the coronavirus pandemic, it has further jumped out and accelerated development for quality facilities, not just the sun and the sea. See the entire research in the attachment: Travelcircus / SO VERÄNDERT CORONA UNSER REISEVERHALTENlast_img read more

Iwobi’s Everton in market for new shirt sponsor

first_imgEverton are in the market for a new shirt sponsor. The Daily Mail says Everton will embark on a search for a blue-chip shirt sponsor after severing their current deal with gambling firm SportPesa. The Goodison Park club had two years to run on their terms with SportPesa, who are based in Africa, but after negotiations involving the parties, a decision has been made to cancel the £9.6million-a-year agreement at the end of this season.Advertisement It is understood Everton do not have to pay a financial penalty for terminating the partnership and that negotiations were amicable with SportPesa, who first had their name on Everton shirts in 2017. Read Also:Spurs rival Everton for Roma defender Smalling An Everton spokesperson said: ” This has been a difficult decision but one that allows us to best deliver on our commercial plan and to grasp the new opportunities now open to us.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too Much10 Big Movie Stars Who Got Famous Thanks To Soap OperasCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable Way7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The Universe10 Risky Jobs Some Women DoThe 18 Most Visited Cities In The WorldThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreReal Faces Of The Women From World Famous Paintings8 Things You Didn’t Know About Coffee2020 Tattoo Trends: Here’s What You’ll See This YearTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimeWho Earns More Than Ronaldo? Loading… last_img read more

Brazil legend Pele in hospital after prostate surgery

first_imgBrazil legend Pele undergoes surgery for a prostate condition after he is admitted to hospital for the second time in six months.The 74-year-old three-time World Cup winner was treated in hospital for a urinary infection in November 2014 after having kidney stones removed.The Albert Einstein Hospital in Sao Paulo confirmed Pele was a patient but did not elaborate on his condition.The ex-Santos star scored 77 goals in 91 appearances for Brazil.last_img

Paul Pierce built his Celtics legacy with patience, production under pressure

first_img“He used to sit right there,” he said, pointing to the chair in the corner of the Celtics’ equipment room. It’s behind Connor’s desk, where pictures of his children are flanked by pictures of Pierce to the right.Connor is the Celtics’ Travel and Equipment Manager – a position he’s held every year since Pierce entered the NBA.Before the Celtics hosted the Lakers on Friday, Johnny Joe eagerly shared memories of Pierce hanging out in the Dungeon, sometimes quietly by himself, other times busting chops and winning over the room with his quirky sense of humor and supreme confidence. He’d eat his soup and pitch fake trade ideas.Big games, small games, it didn’t change Pierce.“Pressure didn’t bother that kid,” Connor said with the kind of nostalgia in his voice that lets you know he’ll be telling these stories for the rest of his life.He gloated about roasting Pierce in 3-point shooting contests until Pierce started roasting him back.“I used to kick his (butt). But as we went on, he’d make a comeback. And, he’d tell me, being the equipment guy, ‘That’s why I wear the uniform and you wash it.’ That was one of his great lines.”This is the Celtics history that really matters – the longtime employees, the ticket-takers, the ushers, the security guards and the people who have seen it all when it comes to Boston Celtics basketball.“They can share in your history. They can share in your story. So, it’s a friend you grow up with,” Pierce said. “… They can share your story with new people who come in. And, that’s the value of having people who have been there and seen it all, especially with one franchise. Your story never gets forgotten. It carries on. Hopefully, my story and my history with the Boston Celtics will get carried on.”If this was a different organization and a different city, the stories might not be what matters most. But this is a place where a near-50-year employee like Francis O’Bryant can make definitive declarations.“He’s really a true Celtic,” O’Bryant said of Pierce, putting him on par with the franchise’s best.The numbers back that up, too.The 26,000-plus points Pierce scored for the organization, the title he helped bring in 2008, those things absolutely resonate with the fans who walk around the Garden concourse wearing his jersey.“He was the face of the franchise,” Dennis Pagones, a Celtics fan from Dracut, Mass., said Friday night with a beer in his hand and a Pierce jersey on his chest.With the Lakers in town to face the Celtics, Pierce was still a prominent character. The in-arena auctions that featured current Celtics and Patriots – they had Pierce memorabilia too. One of the loudest cheers of the night came when local rapper Mike Boston, at center court being recognized for his work in the community, unzipped his jacket to show his Pierce jersey to the Garden crowd.“I’m a great fan of his. That’s why I bought his jersey,” he said. “It doesn’t get better than this.”Another fan, who didn’t want to be interviewed because he only spoke Spanish, still pointed at his No. 34 jersey and said “Paul Pierce” before politely turning to continue watching the game.The people in the city love Pierce because he didn’t bail. He stayed after being stabbed 11 times at a Boston club. He didn’t leave as the team went from bad to good to bad again before the Celtics eventually acquired Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen.“We remember Paul because he was a great player and won a title. I give him more credit for bucking the trend. He went through a lot of lean years, and I don’t think I ever once heard him say ‘I want to leave’ or ‘I don’t want to stick it out,’” his longtime coach Doc Rivers said. “I never heard him say it. He just hung in there and kept wanting the team to get better. … He exhibited an amazing amount of patience.“… In a time when guys get tired because they’re not winning, they want more guys, they want this, he just wanted us to keep pushing, to keep getting better. And, it turned out for him.”Pierce won his title and completed an odd destiny.The kid from Inglewood, the one who grew up rooting for the Lakers and who could walk from his home to the Forum, became a Celtics legend. Sunday, the crowd, the Clippers and the Celtics will honor his legacy.But in the Dungeon, the tributes never stop.In a room filled with jerseys, shorts and sneakers, where space is at a premium, a tribute to Pierce isn’t going anywhere.A stack of six pairs of Pierce’s unworn size-14 sneakers collects dust in the top left corner of the room.“He always asks for them and we won’t give them to him,” Connor said.The shoes, like the stories, are staying put in the Dungeon. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error BOSTON >> Paul Pierce will walk out onto the parquet court for the final time as a player Sunday, surrounded by reminders of the Celtics’ history.Above him, the jersey numbers of some of the NBA’s best – Larry Bird, Bill Russell, Bob Cousy, John Havlicek and others – hang as a reminder of individual greatness past. Next to them, reminders of the Celtics’ 17 NBA titles nearly blanket the ceiling.Pierce’s name will be announced. The crowd will roar in appreciation for the 19 seasons he gave to the NBA and especially for the 15 he dedicated to Boston.He might smile. He might cry. He doesn’t know.center_img “To be a part of this history is something that was important to me,” Pierce said Saturday, a day before his final game in Boston.Undoubtedly, Pierce will be a part of that history.When he played his first game in the TD Garden after being traded to Brooklyn, the camera panned to the two empty spaces for future retired numbers – one of which will certainly be filled by Pierce’s No. 34 and by his teammate Kevin Garnett’s.But, there’s another part of Celtics history that Pierce is a significant part of, the kind you don’t see in the rafters or in the gift shops.Deep inside the Garden, in what Pierce called “The Dungeon,” Johnny Joe Connor is holding court, talking about the most important Celtic of the last quarter century or so.last_img read more

Clippers’ Doc Rivers bemoans the Cavs’ firing of Tyronn Lue

first_imgDoc Rivers sometimes speaks about having been told, as a player, that he would be a good coach someday. He says he never believed it until it happened.It was Doc Rivers who suggested that Lue, as a player, might face a similar fate, having noticed Lue’s attention to detail and appetite for coaches’ scouting reports.“Ty is, he’s like my son,” Rivers said before this season began. “I love the guy. I never thought I’d tell another coach, ‘Hey love ya, take care.’ Yet every time every time me and Ty talk, that’s what we say.”Rivers said he and Lue spoke at length Sunday.“I think it’s awful,” Rivers said. “What it shows you is: Go to the Finals, win it, go to the Finals three years in a row and then come back and get fired. LOS ANGELES — For the first time in four seasons Sunday, Clippers coach Doc Rivers found himself coaching against his son – and hurting for another coach who he has likened to a son.The Clippers’ game against the Washington Wizards at Staples Center on Sunday night represented Austin Rivers’ first meeting with his former team – and his dad – since the 6-foot-4 guard was traded for starting center Marcin Gortat during the offseason.Being reunited as rivals would be fun, Doc Rivers said, in contrast to the “ugly” news that the Cleveland Cavaliers fired Coach Tyronn Lue, one of Rivers’ proteges. Lue coached the Cavs to three consecutive NBA Finals, including the 2016 NBA title, and was 128-83 on the job – but 0-6 this season, following LeBron James’ departure.Lue played for Rivers in Orlando and was one of Rivers’ assistant coach on the Boston Celtics team that won the championship before he came aboard as a Clippers assistant coach – operating as something of a defensive coordinator from 2013 until Cleveland hired him as an associate head coach the next year. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error In a statement to ESPN, Lue said, in part: “I am very grateful for the dedication, sacrifice, and support of all the players on our team, the tremendous coaches I worked with and of course, our incredible fans. Lastly, deep thanks to (owner) Dan Gilbert, (former General Manager) David Griffin and (GM) Koby Altman for the opportunity over the last three years and I only wish the organization success moving forward.”Rivers said he would have had a hard time being so diplomatic.“I thought the way he handled (it), he’s better than me,” Rivers said. “He handled it with just amazing class, thanked everybody – he’s better than me.”GREAT SCOTTCoach Scott Brooks said his Wizards were happy to see Clippers forward Mike Scott, who averaged 8.8 points and shot 53 percent from the floor in 18.5 minutes per game last season for Washington. Scott signed a one-year, $4.32 million deal with the Clippers in July.“He’s loved by all of this team,” Brooks said. “We just saw him a few minutes before (when) he came in the locker room. A lot of hugs. A lot of great memories with Mike. We wish him nothing but the best and hope he has another great year.”This season with the Clippers, Scott is averaging 2.2 points in just fewer than 10 minutes per game. “It makes no sense, it’s the ugly part of our game. He’s really disappointed, but he has a lot to be proud of. He did a heck of a job in extreme circumstances and (I’m) probably no prouder (of) anybody that’s played for me and been a coach under me than Ty Lue. It makes you so angry when you see stuff like that, but there’s nothing you can do about it.”last_img read more