The 50-50 Rule: Program Helps Siblings Overcome Family Conflict While Caring…

first_imgFacebook8Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Home Instead Senior Care® Olympia Home Instead Senior Care offers solutions for aging adults wishing to stay in their homes.A long-time employee of an accounting firm, Mary has been waiting for this promotion for years. “This job is just what I’ve dreamed about all my life,” she excitedly told her best friend. But then Mary’s mom fell and broke her hip. As the youngest in the family and her mom’s presumed favorite, Mary suddenly is thrust into the role of family caregiver and is struggling to keep up with the demands of her new job. “I hate the feeling that I have to choose between caring for my mom and a new job all because my siblings won’t help.”Situations like this are among the family conflicts that caregivers encounter each day while caring for aging parents. Caregiver stress, life-and-death medical crises, financial problems and property disputes often become part of the ongoing saga of a family’s caregiving story. Relationships between adult brothers and sisters can suffer as a result.That’s why the local Home Instead Senior Care® office has launched the 50-50 Rule®, a program that offers strategies for overcoming sibling differences to help families provide the best care for elderly parents.“Any South Puget Sound family that has cared for a senior loved one knows that problems working with siblings can lead to family strife,” said Kelly Cavenah, Administrator of the local Home Instead Senior Care office serving Lewis, Mason, Thurston & Grays Harbor Counties. “Making decisions together, dividing the workload and teamwork are the keys to overcoming family conflict.”The 50-50 Rule refers to the average age (50) when siblings are caring for their parents as well as the need for brothers and sisters to share in the plans for care 50-50. ResearchSharing the responsibility of caring for aging parents tends to begin around age 50.conducted for the Home Instead Senior Care network reveals that an inability to work together often leads to one sibling becoming responsible for the bulk of caregiving in 43 percent of families. And that can result in the deterioration of relationships with brothers and sisters.“If you’re 50, have siblings and are assisting with the care of seniors, it’s time to develop a plan,” Cavenah said. “This program can help.”At the core of the 50-50 Rule public education program is a family relationship and communication guide of real-life situations that features practical advice from sibling relationships expert Dr. Ingrid Connidis from the University of Western Ontario. She says that relationships among siblings should be protected.“Like all relationships, siblings have a history,” Connidis noted. “Whatever happened in the past influences what happens in the present. Regardless of their circumstances, most siblings do feel a responsibility to care for parents that is built from love. And that’s a good place to start – optimistically and assuming the best.”Even the best of circumstances, though, can cause a strain for a family dealing with the issues of an aging parent. That’s where the free 50-50 Rule guide of family situations will help brothers and sisters struggling with any number of topics from trying to divide care and work better as a team to dealing with end-of-life issues. In the guide, Connidis addresses situations, like the one described at the beginning of this release, with practical advice.The guide and a website at SolvingFamilyConflict.com will offer a variety of additional tips and resources for siblings. For more information, visit the site or contact your local Home Instead Senior Care office at 360.570.0049. “Sometimes problems can be alleviated with a little extra home care for seniors and respite for family caregivers,” Cavenah said.The extra effort will be well worth it, Connidis explained. “Siblings are sometimes the only family relationships that endure. After parents, siblings are the ones we’ve known the longest. So there is a depth of empathy we can tap into that goes back to that relationship. When I look at my brother, I still see that little boy playing in the back yard.  And I can still remember caring for my little sister. Those memories are what motivate us to care for our parents and each other. It’s what keeps us connected, even when we’re different. That sibling relationship will continue after parents are gone; research suggests that siblings don’t want to harm their relationships with each other.” ABOUT HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CAREYour local Home Instead Senior Care agency was founded in 2007 with mission to serve seniors and employ Certified Nurse Assistants & Home Care Aides across the South Puget Sound community.  At Home Instead Senior Care, it’s relationship before task, while continuing to provide superior quality service that enhances the lives of seniors everywhere. With a great staff and round the clock availability, they focus on quality over quantity.  Read more about Home Instead Senior Care by clicking here.last_img read more

SANTA MONICA STAKES QUOTES – SATURDAY JANUARY 23, 2016

first_imgFERNANDO PEREZ, LOST BUS, WINNER: “She ran well last time but even I didn’t know she was going to run this well in here. I got a clean break, I took her to the lead and she was comfortable the whole time and at the end, she was still trying.“Corey (Nakatani, on Finest City) was pushing me. We were bumping a little bit down the stretch, but not much to be honest. He just had to take the shot to see if he could get the disqualification.“I didn’t even see Mike (Smith, on favored Tara’s Tango) at the wire. I was too busy fighting with Corey and trying to beat him. I needed to get that done first.” NOTES: Winning owner Terry Lovingier resides in Long Beach. JOCKEY QUOTES TERRY LOVINGIER, OWNER, LOST BUS, WINNER: “I’m kinda lost for words. I didn’t expect this and not too many others did either; she was 60-1. We claimed her (for $32,000 three starts back on Nov. 19) because she battled quite a few times with My Fiona (stakes-winning filly owned by Lovingier) when they were both 2-year-olds. I don’t claim that often anymore, but I did claim quite a few horses before I started breeding them.” GARY SHERLOCK, LOST BUS, WINNER: “This race was a Grade I when I won it last time (with Intangaroo in 2008). Lost Bus was pretty much going to run before I learned Sunday Rules wouldn’t be entered, but I was running for third, and it turned out better than that.“There wasn’t a lot of speed in the race, and I told Fernando to go to the front.”Asked about her next race: “She’s a Cal-bred, so there are plenty of options.” MIKE SMITH, TARA’S TANGO, THIRD: “I tried to get her out of there quickly today and we did much better (than usual) but we couldn’t quite keep up with that forty-four pace. I was having to really, really pedal to stay head and head with them and that’s a long way to be on her, that hard, the whole time. I couldn’t keep her in a hard drive.“I thought I could let them go, give her a bit of a breather and then go at them again on the outside and it worked, but, I just didn’t get there in time.“You just try and do the right thing and sometimes when it works, you’re the hero. Sometimes though, if you don’t win, you don’t look so good.” TRAINER QUOTESlast_img read more