Jewish Families in the Two Rivers Gather to Celebrate Hanukkah

first_imgRabbi Harry Levin of the Open Synagogue leads a song during the lighting of the Menorah in Red Bank Tuesday night, the first day of Hanukkah, the eight day festival of lights that commemorates the victory of the Maccabees over their oppressors, who forbade Jews to practice their religion. Following the battle, the Jewish army reclaimed their temple, and though they found only enough oil to light the candles for one night, the oil lasted for eight days. Jews around the globe celebrate the miracle by lighting one candle on the menorah for each of the eight days of the festival, enjoying family gatherings featuring potato pancakes, jelly doughnuts and other foods fried in oil, playing games and exchanging gifts. Though not considered a major religious holiday on the Jewish calendar, it has become a important time for Jewish families to enjoy gathering togather in celebration of their faith and culture. This year’s observance last from Dec. 20 until Dec. 28.last_img read more

In Fair Haven, Biking and Walkability To Continue As Priorities

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |FAIR HAVEN — At the borough’s annual reorganization meeting Tuesday, Mayor Benjamin Lucarelli predicted the potential future rehabilitation of the iconic Oceanic Bridge will be one of Fair Haven’s top issues in 2018.The 2,712-foot span linking neighboring Rumson and Middletown became a topic of discussion among locals in December, when area residents were invited by Monmouth County to give input on what should be done about the aging structure, built in 1939.Over 200 responses from area residents have been published on the county’s informal website, MonmouthCountyOceanicBridge.com, with many of the respondents expressing their wishes to maintain the personality of the overpass as a low-altitude drawbridge, rather than a raised, fixed-span construction that could potentially impact the scenic views of Navesink River homeowners.Reports from Monmouth County and the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority show the bridge is effectively failing. Combinations of age, deterioration and traffic volume have led both agencies to search for a replacement.Still, others hoped the remodel would not interfere with their ability to bike and walk over the structure.“Fair Haven prides itself on being a walkable and bike-friendly community,” Lucarelli said. “In 2017 we adopted a new transit plan as part of our master plan. So in the new year, we’ll continue to advocate for biking and pedestrian facilities on the new bridge.”“Whether it’s a fixed-span that’s raised or a drawbridge, that’s yet to be seen,” Lucarelli added, stressing that to have a biking and pedestrian-friendly construction “is our main mission.”Christopher Rodriguez is the Borough Council’s liaison to the county committee in charge of the Oceanic Bridge’s reconstruction. The Democratic councilman was due to be sworn in on Tuesday after being elected in November to a three-year term. However, he was out of state and absent from the reorganization session.Rodriguez’s fellow incumbent, Susan Sorensen, was on hand, and the Republican councilwoman was sworn in to a three-year term of her own.The governing body also elected John Peters as Borough Council president. He has served as the head of the finance committee.Lucarelli also oversaw the appointment of a new municipal court judge, Peter Lucas, whose son Peter Lucas Jr. was just named to The Two River Times All-Area Football Team after rushing for 2,196 yards and 31 touchdowns for Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School. Anthony Vecchio was appointed as the new municipal prosecutor.Also recognized at the reorganization session were Fire Company officers Matthew DePonti (Fire Chief), Christopher Schrank (Deputy Chief), Matthew Bufano (First Assistant Chief) and Kevin Countryman (Second Assistant Chief), as were First Aid officers Katy Frissora (Captain), Dan Kane (1st Lieutenant) and Roxanne Keane (2nd Lieutenant). Fire Police officers Douglas Anderson (Captain), Marty Coy (1st Lieutenant) and Daniel Chernavsky (2nd Lieutenant), and Water Rescue Team Members John P. Felsmann (Unit Coordinator), Michael Wiehl (Deputy Coordinator), Jim Cerruti (Operations and Training) and Tim Morrissey (Maintenance and Repair) were also recognized.This article was first published in the Jan. 4-11, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Wally Hayward: going the distance

first_imgIn the course of an athletics career spanning 60 years, Wally Hayward excelled at distances ranging from 100 metres to 100 miles.He competed on the track in his early twenties, represented South Africa at the Olympic Games in the standard marathon, and set world long distance records.His defining achievements, however, were reserved for one of the greatest ultra-marathons of them all: the Comrades.One of the world’s greatest ultra-marathons, the 90-kilometre Comrades Marathon is internationally recognised both for the body-sapping challenge it poses and the camaraderie it fosters among its thousands of participants.Run between Pietermaritzburg, capital of Kwazulu-Natal province, and the coastal city of Durban, the race alternates each year between an “up run” from Durban and a “down run” from Pietermaritzburg.First Comrades victoryWally Hayward won his first Comrades Marathon in 1930, at the age of 21, in a time of 7 hours 27 minutes – then returned to racing shorter distances.Earlier in the same year, he had won the national 10-mile championship, and over the course of the next 20 years he became national champion in distances from three miles to the marathon. He was also decorated for his actions during World War Two, being made a Member of the British Empire.When Hayward returned to the Comrades in 1950 he was discounted as a serious contender because of his age – he was 41 years old. That didn’t stop him from taking the lead at halfway and going on to win in a record time of 6 hours 46 minutes – 41 minutes faster than his winning time two decades before.6-hour barrier, 24-hour recordThe following year, in his first attempt at the Comrades down run, he powered his way to a 6 hours 14 minutes victory, slashing 7 minutes and 57 seconds off Johannes Coleman’s 1939 record.Hayward missed the Comrades in 1952 when he competed for South Africa at the Helsinki Olympic Games, but returned in 1953 to become the first athlete to break the six-hour barrier, in a time of 5 hours 52 minutes.In the same year he travelled to England, where he established new records in the London to Brighton Marathon, the Bath to London 100-miler – and a 24-hour track race staged by England’s Road Runners Club at Motspur Park.Hayward’s distance for “the day race” was 256.4 kilometres, a new world best – and a mark not bettered until two decades later, when Englishman Ron Bentley managed 259.6 kilometres.Hayward followed that up in 1954 by breaking his own record for the Comrades up run with a win in 6 hours 12 minutes.Barred from racingHowever, a second visit to England that year cost him dearly when the South African Athletic and Cycling Association declared him a professional for allegedly accepting donations for expenses.The rules of the race at the time meant that Hayward – having established new records for both the up and down runs and equalled the five wins of Arthur Newton and Hardy Ballington – could no longer run the Comrades.His amateur status was only reinstated 20 years later, in 1974, by which time he professed little appetite for racing, though he attended the finish of the Comrades every year to help inspire other runners.Saving the best till lastThen, in 1988, Hayward was persuaded by friends to take part in the race once more. The country was stunned when the 79-year-old crossed the finish line in 9 hours 44 minutes, beating more than half the field.Hayward’s most dramatic moment, however, came the following year, in 1989, when he completed the down run at the age of 80. There was hardly a dry eye in the stadium as he staggered across the line in an obviously distressed state, making the 11 hours cut-off time by a mere 1 minute and 57 seconds.To this day, he remains the oldest finisher in the history of the Comrades Marathon.The Wally Hayward medalWally Hayward died in May 2006 at the age of 97. In November, the Comrades Marathon Association announced that a new medal, the Wally Hayward medal, would be presented to runners for the first time in 2007.The medals are awarded to those runners who fail to earn Comrades gold medals – awarded to the first 10 men and women finishers – but still come in under the six-hour barrier first broken by Hayward in 1953.“The late Wally Hayward was one of the greatest ever Comrades runners, with seven finishes, including five wins,” association chairman Dave Dixon said in announcing the new medal.“He had a remarkable Comrades career that spanned 60 years, and is still the oldest person ever to finish the race.“In creating this medal, the Comrades Marathon Association salutes a man who epitomized the spirit of the race and inspired thousands of men and women to run it.”Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Three Elements Missing from The Only Sales Guide

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now One of the constraints you must deal with when you write a book is the word limit. Most business books are around 60,000 words. This is in large part about the costs of publishing and profitably selling the book, but there is also good reason to prune the writing, something that always improves the writing.When I wrote The Only Sales Guide You’ll Ever Need, I started with 21 elements, losing 3 of them in the editing process. The 3 elements that are missing belonged in the book then, and they are still relevant now.The first thing to get cut was Empathy and Emotional Intelligence. The empathy part made it a natural fit for integration into Caring (Chapter 3), and so it was weaved into that section. The emotional intelligence was removed completely, even though it is an attribute that can be developed. One who is able to recognize another person’s emotions, as well as their own, is more effective in sales (and most everything else where human being are concerned).The next thing to be cut was Differentiation. That chapter was written as the closing chapter and had very little to do with the original chapter, where the skill was identified as being able to differentiate yourself and your offering from your competitors. The concluding chapter of TOSG is one of my favorites, but it didn’t do the work of providing guidance on creating the outcome necessary in modern B2B sales.There was a chapter that I wrote separately from the rest of the chapters. It was different from the rest, and in some ways more important. It was the mindset attribute of Passion. The idea there was one part being hyped on what you are doing, and one part giving yourself over to your work. If people were half as passionate about their company and their product as they are the sports teams they follow, they’d do a heck of a lot better work and have greater success.There may be a companion document for TOSG in the future to remedy these elements begin left out.last_img read more