WILL ILOILO CITY SINK OR SWIM?

first_imgAccordingto Climate Central, over the course of the 21st century, global sea levels areprojected to rise between about 2 and 7 feet, and possibly more. The keyvariables will be how much warming pollution humanity dumps into the atmosphereand how quickly the land-based ice sheets in Greenland and especiallyAntarctica destabilize. Projecting where and when that rise could translateinto increased flooding and permanent inundation is profoundly importantfor coastal planning and for reckoning the costs of humanity’s emissions. “Infact, based on CoastalDEM, roughly 110 million people currently live on landbelow high tide line. This population is almost certainly protected to somedegree by existing coastal defenses, which may or may not be adequate forfuture sea levels,” Climate Central stated. Basedon sea level projections for 2050, land currently home to 300 million peoplewill fall below the elevation of an average annual coastal flood. By 2100, landnow home to 200 million people could sit permanently below the high tideline.  Nevertheless, he would seek theopinion of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau and other concerned governmentagencies about the study, said Treñas. “But whether malubog ang Iloilo City, that is another story,” said Treñas. According to the study, Iloilo City isamong major cities in the Philippines that rising sea levels could swallow. Otherareas were Roxas City in Capiz province, Cebu City, northwestern Metro Manilaand parts of Bulacan, the city of Manila, southwestern Manila, and ZamboangaCity. “Waayko kabalo kon ano na-refer ‘ya, bilog nga Iloilo City or part sang Iloilo City? I will have to checkthat,” said the mayor. “First of all I do not know whetherthat will really happen. Second, I do not know who made the report,” saidTreñas. Sealevel rise is one of the best known of climate change’s many dangers. Ashumanity pollutes the atmosphere with greenhouse gases, the planet warms. Andas it does so, ice sheets and glaciers melt and warming sea water expands,increasing the volume of the world’s oceans. The study results were published inthe journal Nature Communications. IN THE RED. Parts of Iloilo City are vulnerable to sea level rise, according to a study conducted by Climate Central, a research organization on climate change based in the United States. It produced this map using a new digital elevation model. Screenshot from coastal.climatecentral.org Treñas acknowledged that the rising ofseawater is one reason why the city government has pumping stations. According to the study, rising seascould affect three times more people by 2050 than previously thought,threatening to erase some of the world’s coastal cities.Iloilo City is a coastal metropolis. It faces the Iloilo Strait. “Because magsugata ang high tide, nagasulod ang tubig sa drainage naton,” he said. Theconsequences range from near-term increases in coastal flooding that can damageinfrastructure and crops to the permanent displacement of coastal communities. ILOILO City – “Things like that shouldnot be immediately accepted by anyone.” This is Mayor Jerry Treñas’ reaction toa report about this city possibly disappearing by 2050 due to rising sealevels. The study was conducted by Climate Central, a United States-based“independent organization of leading scientists and journalists researching andreporting the facts about changing climate and its impact on the public.” Inits website, Climate Central stated that projecting flood risk involves notonly estimating future sea level rise but also comparing it against landelevations. However, sufficiently accurate elevation data are eitherunavailable or inaccessible to the public, or prohibitively expensive in mostof the world outside the United States, Australia, and parts of Europe. Thisclouds understanding of where and when sea level rise could affect coastalcommunities in the most vulnerable parts of the world. According to Climate Central, a newdigital elevation model it produced helps fill the gap. That model, CoastalDEM,shows that many of the world’s coastlines are far lower than has been generallyknown and that sea level rise could affect hundreds of millions of more peoplein the coming decades than previously understood. Despitethese existing defenses, Climate Central said increasing ocean flooding,permanent submergence, and coastal defense costs are likely to deliver profoundhumanitarian, economic, and political consequences. Treñas said he heard the new about thestudy but was unsure about its veracity. The city’s pumping stations are onMuelle Loney Street one at the Iloilo River. Tolessen the threat, Climate Central suggests adapting measures such asconstruction of levees and other defenses or relocation to higher ground. “Thiswill happen not just in the distant future, but also within the lifetimes ofmost people alive today,” it added./PNlast_img read more

Bench warrant served vs homicide suspect

first_imgCayetano faces homicide charges, apolice report showed. The 49-year-old resident Rene Cayetano wasserved a bench warrant around 7 a.m. on Thursday. He was detained in the custodial facilityof the Balasan police station./PNcenter_img ILOILO City – A man was nabbed in BarangayAranjuez, Balasan, Iloilo after he failed to appear in court for a hearing.last_img

Girl, 14, found dead in Bago City

first_imgShe was 14-year-old Grade 8 studentJemeiah Rose Oliveros who was found with her shirt partially pulled upward andwithout undergarments around 6 a.m. on Jan. 6, police said. BACOLOD City – Already in the state ofdecomposition, the body of a girl was found in Barangay Binubuhan, Bago City,Negros Occidental. According to police investigators,Oliveros left their house around 11:30 a.m. on Jan. 1. She failed to returnhome since then. Authorities cordon the area where the body of Jemeiah Rose Oliveros, already in the state of decomposition, was found in Barangay Binubuhan, Bago City, Negros Occidental on Jan. 6. Police officers are still investigating the cause of her death. Bago City Police Office Officers of the Bago City policestation are still investigating the incident./PNlast_img read more

White House postpones Spain visit due virus threat

first_imgThe visit, including a lavish, black-tiestate dinner hosted by President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump, hadbeen announced for April 21. White House press secretary StephanieGrisham cited the coronavirus pandemic in announcing the postponement onWednesday. Spain’s King Felipe VI arrives to deliver his speech during a ceremony to honor victims of terror attacks in Europe, at the Trocadero in Paris, Wednesday March 11, 2020. AP WASHINGTON – The White House says it’s postponing an upcoming state visit by Spain’s King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia because of the coronavirus pandemic. “In order for the United States andSpain to continue to devote their full resources and attention to the COVID-19response, the April 21, 2020, White House State Visit by Their Majesties KingFelipe VI and Queen Letizia of Spain has been postponed,” Grisham said, usingthe name for the disease that is caused by the novel coronavirus. (AP)last_img read more

Another COVID-19 frontliner dies; Confirmed cases now over 500

first_imgMANILA – Another coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) frontliner, a renowned cardiologist in the country, joined the growing list of virus casualty as the confirmed cases have reached over 500 on Tuesday. Dr. Raul Diaz Jara. Philippine Heart Association PHA also noted Jara’s massive contribution and devotion to the advancement of Philippine cardiology. Dr. Raul Diaz Jara, an esteemed cardiologist and internist, died on early Tuesday morning after testing positive to COVID-19, the Philippine Heart Association (PHA) said in a statement. “It is with profound sadness that we announce the loss of one of the great pillars of cardiology, PHA past president Dr. Raul Diaz Jara. He was a great father, teacher, mentor, poet, author, singer, colleague, friend,” the PHA said in a statement. Several other frontliners have succumbed to COVID-19. Cardiologist Israel Bactol of the Philippine Heart Center, anesthesiologist Gregorio Macasaet III of Manila Doctors Hospital, and oncologist Rose Pulido of the San Juan de Dios Hospital passed away recently. The number of people who tested positive for the coronavirus disease in the Philippines jumped to 552, with the death toll remaining at 33. The number of patients who have recovered is now at 19./PNlast_img read more

Four SAP recipients jailed over ‘pusoy’

first_imgThey were detained in the lockup facilityof the Talisay City police station, facing charges for violation ofPresidential Decree 1602, which prescribes stiffer penalties on illegalgambling./PN Confiscated from their possession were adeck of playing cards and bet money which amounted to P794. BACOLOD City – Police arrested fourrecipients of the government’s social amelioration program for playing theillegal card game of pusoy inBarangay Bubog, Talisay City, Negros Occidental.center_img They were Mary Grace Roldan, 37; JanalynDayon, 36;  Nika Maravilla, 22; andLorena Nolido, 54, a police report showed.The suspects – all residents of the village – were arrested around 2:25 p.m. onApril 25, it added.last_img read more

Gov’t, rebels clash in Igabras

first_imgAlso, he added, the 61IB received intelligence information that the NPA was planning to sabotage the operation of Century Peak Energy Corp. (CPEC) in Igbaras. Batara said his troops checked out the area after having been alerted by concerned civilians about armed men here. Batara said all of his men were unhurt. But he believed they may have wounded some rebels, noting trails of blood along the rebels’ escape path. Soldiers recovered an M16 armalite rifle, bullets, a magazine, a bandolier, an NPA flag, medical supplies, food packs, propaganda materials and personal items. The rebels fled after several minutes of firefight, according to Lieutenant Colonel Joel Benedict Batara, commanding officer of the 61IB.center_img ILOILO City – The Philippine Army and New People’s Army (NPA) exchanged fire in Barangay Corocuan, Igbaras, Iloilo on June 6. Troops of the 61st Infantry Battalion (61IB) encountered some 10 rebels while on a combat operation around 2 p.m. “These terrorists were already declared persona non grata by the people of Igbaras because of their atrocities which hamper peace and development in the area,” said Batara./PNlast_img read more

Brazil resumes publishing virus toll, criticizes WHO

first_imgFar-right President Jair Bolsonaro’s government had stopped publishing the total number of deaths from the new coronavirus Friday, saying it was adopting a new methodology and would only report the number of deaths recorded in the past 24 hours in its daily bulletin. BRASILA – Brazil’s government resumed publishing the country’s total death toll from the coronavirus pandemic Tuesday, after facing accusations of trying to hide the magnitude of its raging health crisis. That drew accusations of foul play from a long list of high-profile critics, as well as a ruling from Supreme Court Justice Alexandre de Moraes on Monday that the government must return to the old format. (AFP)center_img Health workers assist a COVID-19 patient at the Gilberto Novaes Municipal Hospital in Manaus, Brazil. AFPlast_img read more

Korean agency procures rice worth P5M from Panay farmers

first_imgKorea International Cooperation Agency purchases 4,000 bags of 50-kilogram well-milled rice from farmers in Panay Island. These will be donated in support of the relief efforts of the national government. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-WESTERN VISAYAS VIA PNA The rice supplies will be repacked into 6-kg. bags and shipped to Manila as KOICA’s donation to the Department of Social Welfare and Development National Resource Operations Center. The bags of rice KOICA purchased are currently stocked at the LFT, which serves as the consolidating center. ILOILO City –  In support of the relief efforts of the national government against coronavirus disease 2019, the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) has purchased 4,000 bags of 50-kilogram (kg.) well-milled rice valued at around P5 million from farmers in Panay Island. Recoter said the LFT is just waiting for the materials – ordered from Cebu – that would be used for the repacking. The rice stocks were acquired from the BTCs in Tapaz and Jamindan, Capiz; Lambunao and San Miguel in Iloilo; and Patnongon in Antique, as well as from the rice-processing complex. The KOICA funded the Panay Island Upland Sustainable Rural Development project which has 10 Bayanihan Tipon Centers (BTCs) in strategic places in the island and a Local Food Terminal (LFT) in San Miguel, Iloilo. It also funded the Iloilo Rice Processing Complex in Pototan town. “They bought here in Iloilo because they also patronize their projects,” Department of Agriculture (DA) in Region 6 executive director Remelyn Recoter said Thursday. “The identified municipalities are more than self-sufficient. With this, at least they have (an) additional market,” Recoter said. She expressed hope that there would be more purchases, although she said the KOICA also extended assistance to other areas where they have projects, such as in Mindanao. The DA-6’s record showed that Patnongon is 247-percent rice sufficient; Jamindan, 257 percent; Tapaz, 93 percent; Lambunao, 169 percent; Pototan, 334 percent; and San Miguel, 207 percent.(With a report from PNA/PN)last_img read more

HEALTH HAZARD: DOH warns of adverse health effects from oil spill

first_imgAccording to Sta. Lucia, the top three leading causes of health complaints in evacuation centers were difficulty of breathing, nasal congestion and sore throat. ILOILO City – Harsh fumes from the bunker fuel that spilled from a power barge in Barangay Bo. Obrero, Lapuz district pose serious health threats, the Department of Health (DOH) Center for Health Development in Western Visayas cautioned coastal residents adversely affected by the July 3 oil spill. * Consult the doctor if symptoms do not improve * Nasal irritation and nausea may be experience To ensure health and nutrition of affected residents, the DOH-6 also forwarded recommendations to the City Health Office. These were the following: * Pregnancy tests kit should be made available * Stay away from the area when you see or smell oil on the beach * Anticipation and management of communicable diseases * Prolonged contact may cause skin reddening, edema and burning For adolescents   * Provide flu vaccination * Good hygiene practices * Regular check-ups for senior –BP blood, sugar check-up The latest Philippine Coast Guard estimate of the volume of bunker oil that spilled out of the ruptured tank of AC Energy’s power barge in Bo. Obrero was at 251,000 liters, reaching as far as Guimaras’ coastal barangays and the northern coastal towns of Leganes and Dumangas in Iloilo province. * Ensure ready emergency transport vehicle * Ensure prepositioning of family planning commodities * Stays indoors in an air-conditioned area and avoid strenuous outdoor activity * Restrict movement outside * Do not use oil-contaminated water for human or animal consumption * wear protective gear like gowns, gloves, boots and goggles For women with partners but are not pregnant * Prevention of abuse * Ensure adequate lighting * Effects on skin may worsen by subsequent exposure to UV rays from the sun * Separate toilets and bath for boys and girls or 1 room per family * Ensure safety from abuse or rape * Informed consent and volunteerism when counseling and providing family planning methods * Do not fish in oil spill-affected waters The DOH-6 also presented ways to cope up with the oil spill. These were the following: * Ensure their pre-natal package is provided For senior citizens * Injury prevention for children-adult supervision at all times * Do not eat fish, shellfish and other seafood from the area with oily residue or fish that has petroleum odor For Children These residents of Barangay Bo. Obrero, Lapuz, Iloilo City help in the cleanup operation of the oil spill from Power Barge 102. Prolonged exposure the spilled bunker oil may bring adverse health effects, the Department of Health warns. IAN PAUL CORDERO/PN For responders and clean-u workers: These 255 families were made up of 931 individuals who temporarily moved to four evacuation centers. Sta. Lucia urged the public to avoid eating fish, shellfish and other seafood from areas with oily residue or seafood with petroleum odor. * Repeated exposure may cause upper respiratory tract conditions * Avoid contact with sediment, sand, soil, or outdoor/indoor surfaces with visible oil contamination According to Sta. Lucia, adverse health effects from harsh fumes of spilled bunker oil can be avoided if warnings are diligently heeded For infants * Provision of malong to mothers * Set-up a safe space by setting up a women and child protection desk (to be coordinated with PNP) * Prevent pets from entering oil-contaminated areas As of July 8, the number of families in Barangay Bo. Obrero adversely affected by the oil spill reached 255, according to the City Social Welfare and Development Office (CSWDO). * Acute inhalation may lead to euphoria, vertigo, headache and chest pain Sta. Lucia listed negative health effects of spilled bunker oil. These were the following: * dispose used gloves properly For pregnant women   * Wash skin which has come in contact with oil-contaminated water, with soap and water * Do not swim in areas affected by the oil spill * If possible pregnant women should have another venue where they can be protected from COVID-19 * If possible senior citizens to be accommodated on lower floor to prevent falls from stairs an slipping from wet area * Remind seniors on their maintenance medicines “Affected families and individuals in Bo. Obrero and nearby areas are advised to stay away from the area especially if oil is evident,” according to Dr. May Ann Soliva-Sta. Lucia, head of DOH-6’s health emergency management staff. * Triage, check exposure, database immunization review at heath center * Immunization * wash oiled clothing and goggles after each clean-up operation She assured health protocols such as physical distancing are enforced in evacuation centers to prevent transmission of coronavirus disease 2019./PNlast_img read more