The 50-50 Rule: Program Helps Siblings Overcome Family Conflict While Caring…

first_imgFacebook8Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Home Instead Senior Care® Olympia Home Instead Senior Care offers solutions for aging adults wishing to stay in their homes.A long-time employee of an accounting firm, Mary has been waiting for this promotion for years. “This job is just what I’ve dreamed about all my life,” she excitedly told her best friend. But then Mary’s mom fell and broke her hip. As the youngest in the family and her mom’s presumed favorite, Mary suddenly is thrust into the role of family caregiver and is struggling to keep up with the demands of her new job. “I hate the feeling that I have to choose between caring for my mom and a new job all because my siblings won’t help.”Situations like this are among the family conflicts that caregivers encounter each day while caring for aging parents. Caregiver stress, life-and-death medical crises, financial problems and property disputes often become part of the ongoing saga of a family’s caregiving story. Relationships between adult brothers and sisters can suffer as a result.That’s why the local Home Instead Senior Care® office has launched the 50-50 Rule®, a program that offers strategies for overcoming sibling differences to help families provide the best care for elderly parents.“Any South Puget Sound family that has cared for a senior loved one knows that problems working with siblings can lead to family strife,” said Kelly Cavenah, Administrator of the local Home Instead Senior Care office serving Lewis, Mason, Thurston & Grays Harbor Counties. “Making decisions together, dividing the workload and teamwork are the keys to overcoming family conflict.”The 50-50 Rule refers to the average age (50) when siblings are caring for their parents as well as the need for brothers and sisters to share in the plans for care 50-50. ResearchSharing the responsibility of caring for aging parents tends to begin around age 50.conducted for the Home Instead Senior Care network reveals that an inability to work together often leads to one sibling becoming responsible for the bulk of caregiving in 43 percent of families. And that can result in the deterioration of relationships with brothers and sisters.“If you’re 50, have siblings and are assisting with the care of seniors, it’s time to develop a plan,” Cavenah said. “This program can help.”At the core of the 50-50 Rule public education program is a family relationship and communication guide of real-life situations that features practical advice from sibling relationships expert Dr. Ingrid Connidis from the University of Western Ontario. She says that relationships among siblings should be protected.“Like all relationships, siblings have a history,” Connidis noted. “Whatever happened in the past influences what happens in the present. Regardless of their circumstances, most siblings do feel a responsibility to care for parents that is built from love. And that’s a good place to start – optimistically and assuming the best.”Even the best of circumstances, though, can cause a strain for a family dealing with the issues of an aging parent. That’s where the free 50-50 Rule guide of family situations will help brothers and sisters struggling with any number of topics from trying to divide care and work better as a team to dealing with end-of-life issues. In the guide, Connidis addresses situations, like the one described at the beginning of this release, with practical advice.The guide and a website at SolvingFamilyConflict.com will offer a variety of additional tips and resources for siblings. For more information, visit the site or contact your local Home Instead Senior Care office at 360.570.0049. “Sometimes problems can be alleviated with a little extra home care for seniors and respite for family caregivers,” Cavenah said.The extra effort will be well worth it, Connidis explained. “Siblings are sometimes the only family relationships that endure. After parents, siblings are the ones we’ve known the longest. So there is a depth of empathy we can tap into that goes back to that relationship. When I look at my brother, I still see that little boy playing in the back yard.  And I can still remember caring for my little sister. Those memories are what motivate us to care for our parents and each other. It’s what keeps us connected, even when we’re different. That sibling relationship will continue after parents are gone; research suggests that siblings don’t want to harm their relationships with each other.” ABOUT HOME INSTEAD SENIOR CAREYour local Home Instead Senior Care agency was founded in 2007 with mission to serve seniors and employ Certified Nurse Assistants & Home Care Aides across the South Puget Sound community.  At Home Instead Senior Care, it’s relationship before task, while continuing to provide superior quality service that enhances the lives of seniors everywhere. With a great staff and round the clock availability, they focus on quality over quantity.  Read more about Home Instead Senior Care by clicking here.last_img read more

Intercity Transit Operates Regular Schedules on Veterans Day

first_imgFacebook6Tweet0Pin0Submitted by Intercity TransitIntercity Transit operates on regular schedules on Veterans Day, Sunday, November 11, 2018. Customer Service, located in the Olympia Transit Center, will be open regular weekend hours, 9:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. on the holiday.All route and schedule information is on the Intercity Transit website.As the holiday season approaches, please keep in mind that Intercity Transit will be closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas and New Year’s Day. More information will be provided about these closures as they get closer.For information about Intercity Transit services, visit intercitytransit.com or call 360-786-1881.last_img read more

Summer Is Over – It’s Time For Cool Weather Salads

first_imgChef Jams Conroy, director of prepared foods for Food Circus Supermarkets, with some of the produce department’s assortment of fresh winter greens. Photo by Andy McDonoughFall and winter meals aren’t just about comfort foodby Andy McDonoughWhen the weather turns cooler it’s time to think about all the great cold weather comfort foods, like butternut squash soup, apple cobbler served up warm with a scoop of ice cream and aromatic pumpkin pies with a dollop of fresh whipped cream.But hold on — I may put on a few pounds just writing that sentence. Let’s consider that eating well should not be a seasonal event. The cooler weather has plenty to offer for home chefs past the comfort foods in which we love to indulge, many of which we know are more about tradition than good health.What about salads? Are we done with them at the end of August? No, and not by a long shot. When the summer salad joins our memories of sand and surf is when things start to get interesting in the salad department.It’s true that through the miracles of the modern supermarket produce department we could have lettuce and tomato salads year-round, but if you believe that the summer salad has had its day you’ll welcome the bold tastes and new textures that winter salads have to offer.Winter salads can’t rely on ripe tomatoes and delicate butter lettuce to make them shine. Instead, it’s hearty greens, salty cheese, and crunchy nuts make distinctive winter salads delicious. The tastes are bold and offer lots of interesting combinations to explore. Use the building blocks below to create your own perfect winter salad or try out the recipe at the end of this article.It’s an easy and distinctive  Radicchio Hazelnut Blue Cheese Salad, perfect to accompany a hearty cold weather meal or stand on its own.Start With Hearty Greens, Chicories or Cabbages  – Avoid the wilted lettuces and mesclun mixes in plastic bags or flown in from around the globe. Go instead with the hearty greens, the crunchy chicories, or the crisp cabbages that flourish in the fall and through winter. Your wondering, what a chicory is, right? Belgian endive, escarole, and radicchio are all chicories. Related to, but bolder than lettuces, chicories have sturdier leaves and a more assertive flavor famous for its bitter edge.  Use their distinctive flavors to add a bright, bracing element to your salads. Best of all, they are a fall and winter crop and are available fresh locally when lettuces are not.Speaking of alternatives to lettuce, many of the greens you may be used to cooking (chard and kale in particular) are delicious raw and make for great salads. Buy small-leafed versions or cut larger leaves into bite-size pieces or ribbon-like shreds.Add a Hit of Salt – Heart greens and chicories can handle a lot of flavor, including plenty of salt if you’re so inclined. Feta, cojita, and blue cheeses are all great matches for winter salads – just crumble them to taste. Olives, either whole pitted, or pitted and chopped, are also good bets. You can even create your own Green Olive Dressing mixing in some minced green olives. Don’t overdo it with mixing salty players. Pick one and let it stand out.Toss In Something Crunchy – Winter greens have a lot of body and textures of their own, so feel free to add some serious crunch if you are so inclined. Nuts, seeds, croutons, slices of radish, pieces of fennel, slim cuts of uncooked carrot – anything that will give that crunchy element to the dish.Don’t Forget the Sweet Option –  The bitter edge that underlies winter greens and chicories can benefit from a little bit of sweetness. Roasted beets and apples are good to use for balance, as are winter fruits like pears, oranges, kumquats or dates. Dried raisins, cranberries, blueberries and other fruits can add distinctive texture and sweetness, too.Or, Lose the Leaves Entirely  – Don’t forget that some of the very best summer salads, like a Marinated Green Bean Salad, don’t always involve leaves. Some of the best possible winter salads don’t involve greens of any sort. Roasted beet salads, Celery Red Onion Salad, Celery Root Salad, or Lentil Salad are great and don’t need a leaf.Here is a versatile gem of a salad is crisp and boldly flavorful. It’s easy to put its few key ingredients together in minutes, but tasty enough to impress.Radicchio Hazelnut Blue Cheese SaladThe secret to this salad is the balance of its three strong players: the standout taste of radicchio; the bold, salty flavor of blue cheese; and crunch from the hazelnuts. If you’re not a fan of blue cheese, substitute a cheese you like or just leave it out. The radicchio and hazelnuts are a great combination and can carry this dish on their own. Nut allergy? Then, by all means, loose the nuts.  The strong flavors of radicchio and blue cheese balance each other nicely, but you don’t leave out the crunch entirely. Try it with sunflower seeds or pepitas (pumpkin seeds).Prep Time: 10 minutesTotal Time: 10 minutesYield: 4 servingsIngredients:1 head radicchio1 shallot (optional)2 Tbsp. agrodulce or 2 Tbsp. red wine vinegar plus 1 tsp. sugar2 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oilSalt1/2 cup toasted, chopped hazelnuts1/4 cup crumbled blue cheesePreparation:Trim and chop radicchio. Wash and dry and set aside. Meanwhile, mince the shallot and put it in a large salad bowl. Add agrodulce (a traditional sweet and sour sauce in Italian cuisine) or vinegar and sugar and let sit 5 to 10 minutes, whisk in olive oil and add salt to taste.Add radicchio to salad bowl and toss gently but thoroughly until leaves are evenly coated with the dressing. Now you can either add the hazelnuts and blue cheese and toss everything together, or divide the radicchio evenly among 4 salad plates and sprinkle with its share of the hazelnuts and blue cheese for a more elegant presentation.last_img read more

Jewish Families in the Two Rivers Gather to Celebrate Hanukkah

first_imgRabbi Harry Levin of the Open Synagogue leads a song during the lighting of the Menorah in Red Bank Tuesday night, the first day of Hanukkah, the eight day festival of lights that commemorates the victory of the Maccabees over their oppressors, who forbade Jews to practice their religion. Following the battle, the Jewish army reclaimed their temple, and though they found only enough oil to light the candles for one night, the oil lasted for eight days. Jews around the globe celebrate the miracle by lighting one candle on the menorah for each of the eight days of the festival, enjoying family gatherings featuring potato pancakes, jelly doughnuts and other foods fried in oil, playing games and exchanging gifts. Though not considered a major religious holiday on the Jewish calendar, it has become a important time for Jewish families to enjoy gathering togather in celebration of their faith and culture. This year’s observance last from Dec. 20 until Dec. 28.last_img read more

In Fair Haven, Biking and Walkability To Continue As Priorities

first_imgBy Chris Rotolo |FAIR HAVEN — At the borough’s annual reorganization meeting Tuesday, Mayor Benjamin Lucarelli predicted the potential future rehabilitation of the iconic Oceanic Bridge will be one of Fair Haven’s top issues in 2018.The 2,712-foot span linking neighboring Rumson and Middletown became a topic of discussion among locals in December, when area residents were invited by Monmouth County to give input on what should be done about the aging structure, built in 1939.Over 200 responses from area residents have been published on the county’s informal website, MonmouthCountyOceanicBridge.com, with many of the respondents expressing their wishes to maintain the personality of the overpass as a low-altitude drawbridge, rather than a raised, fixed-span construction that could potentially impact the scenic views of Navesink River homeowners.Reports from Monmouth County and the North Jersey Transportation Planning Authority show the bridge is effectively failing. Combinations of age, deterioration and traffic volume have led both agencies to search for a replacement.Still, others hoped the remodel would not interfere with their ability to bike and walk over the structure.“Fair Haven prides itself on being a walkable and bike-friendly community,” Lucarelli said. “In 2017 we adopted a new transit plan as part of our master plan. So in the new year, we’ll continue to advocate for biking and pedestrian facilities on the new bridge.”“Whether it’s a fixed-span that’s raised or a drawbridge, that’s yet to be seen,” Lucarelli added, stressing that to have a biking and pedestrian-friendly construction “is our main mission.”Christopher Rodriguez is the Borough Council’s liaison to the county committee in charge of the Oceanic Bridge’s reconstruction. The Democratic councilman was due to be sworn in on Tuesday after being elected in November to a three-year term. However, he was out of state and absent from the reorganization session.Rodriguez’s fellow incumbent, Susan Sorensen, was on hand, and the Republican councilwoman was sworn in to a three-year term of her own.The governing body also elected John Peters as Borough Council president. He has served as the head of the finance committee.Lucarelli also oversaw the appointment of a new municipal court judge, Peter Lucas, whose son Peter Lucas Jr. was just named to The Two River Times All-Area Football Team after rushing for 2,196 yards and 31 touchdowns for Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School. Anthony Vecchio was appointed as the new municipal prosecutor.Also recognized at the reorganization session were Fire Company officers Matthew DePonti (Fire Chief), Christopher Schrank (Deputy Chief), Matthew Bufano (First Assistant Chief) and Kevin Countryman (Second Assistant Chief), as were First Aid officers Katy Frissora (Captain), Dan Kane (1st Lieutenant) and Roxanne Keane (2nd Lieutenant). Fire Police officers Douglas Anderson (Captain), Marty Coy (1st Lieutenant) and Daniel Chernavsky (2nd Lieutenant), and Water Rescue Team Members John P. Felsmann (Unit Coordinator), Michael Wiehl (Deputy Coordinator), Jim Cerruti (Operations and Training) and Tim Morrissey (Maintenance and Repair) were also recognized.This article was first published in the Jan. 4-11, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

Bombers open season with lopsided win over Rossland; Royals dump LVR in girl’s game

first_imgBy Bruce FuhrThe Nelson Daily SportsLike a well-oiled machine, the L.V. Rogers Bombers picked apart the Rossland Royals in every facet of the opening West Kootenay High School Boy’s Basketball game Tuesday at the Hangar.The Bombers shook off any pre-season rust, outscoring the Royals 22-3 in the second period to dump Rossland 87-18.The game was the first of the hoop season for both teams, but the Bombers definitely looked like the a squad in mid-season form.“I thought we were okay, but I find myself hyper-critical of the way we play,” Bomber head coach Ross Naka told The Nelson Daily following the game.“Rossland had only six guys so I cycled everyone in to the game. But (overall) I was pretty happy with what went on out on the court.”Rossland kept pace for the remainder of the first period — trailing 22-12 — but after the teams returned to the court for the second period it was all LVR.“I thought we started a bit slow on defence but in the second half there was a lot more talking on defence and we looked much, much better,” explained Naka, pleased with his young squad consisting of nine Grade 11s, two seniors and a Grade 10 player.McLain Sandeveland led the Bomber attack with 16 points while Matt Zukowski added 14.Connor Banks scored 12 and Jack Sturrup and Isaiah Kingdon each had 10.For Rossland Diego Mrlenaro had 12 points.The Bombers set out on the road Friday to play in the 51st annual Ok-kan-aqen Invitational Boy’s Basketball Tournament hosted by defending AA champion South Okanagan Hornets.The Bombers get fed to the wolves right off as LVR meets South Okanagan at noon Friday.The tournament is being played in Osoyoos as the gymnasium is not ready for play after a fire gutted the school earlier this year.Royals explode past LVR with big fourth quarter The news was not as good for the LVR Senior Girls as Rossland out scored the home side 29-10 in the fourth quarter en route to a 49-30 win in West Kootenay High School Girl’s Basketball action.Carrie Smith led the Royals with 15 points as the Royals converted three baskets from behind the three-point arc.Devyn Parker, Kiandra McLaren, and Samantha Einarson each had four points to lead the Bombers.LVR travels to Vernon Friday to play in the Vernon Panthers Invitational Tournament.First up for LVR is South Okanagan Hornets.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

Former Leaf Gus Correale selected AJHL player of the week

first_imgCorreale then went to Vernon Vipers of the B.C. Hockey League where he was traded after on October, 26th 2010 to the Storm for defenceman, Austin Baecker & future considerations. Correale went pointless in nine regular season games with the Vipers. In 19 games with the Storm this season Correale has recorded (9-12-21).In 118 games with the Storm, Correale has 29 goals and 51 assists for 80 points.Grande Prairie, winners of six straight games, is third in the Northern Diviison of the AJHL two points behind division-leading Whitecourt.The Nelson Leafs return to the ice Friday travelling to Grand Forks to face the lowly Bruins.Nelson, winners of seven consecutive games, leads the Murdoch Division by two points ahead of Castlegar Rebels.The Leafs host Golden Rockets Saturday at the NDCC Arena at 7 p.m.The Rebels have won four straight games. Castlegar hosts Beaver Valley Nitehawks Friday before playing Spokane Braves in a home-and-home series, Saturday in the Sunflower City and Sunday back south of the 49th parallel. Former Nelson Leaf Gus Correale scored three times and had a total of six points to earn player-of-the-week honours in the Alberta Junior Hockey League.Correale, now playing for the Grande Prairie Storm, accumulated the points during a two-game weekend series sweep of the Whitecourt Wolverines.The 19-year-old forward scored the winning goal in overtime in a 5-4 win Friday.Saturday, Correale scored twice and added two assists in an 8-4 drubbing for the Storm. He also earned Pro Hockey Life Player of the Game Award in the contest.Correale is currently enjoying a six-game point streak totaling 10 points.  The Prince George native leads Grande Prairie in scoring with 21 points, an average of 1.2 points per game.Correale played for the Leafs during the 2009-10 Kootenay International Junior Hockey League season scoring 14 goals while adding 29 assists as a 16-year-old rookie.Nelson lost out to Revelstoke that season in the KIJHL Final.last_img read more

CAUTIOUS GIANT SKIMS RAIL TO TAKE $58,000 ALLOWANCE FEATURE BY ONE LENGTH UNDER BAZE; GAINES TRAINEE RELISHES WET FAST TRACK & GETS 6 ½ FURLONGS IN 1:15.45

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (May 14, 2015)–Cautious Giant stalked a fast early pace and skimmed the rail into and around the far turn en route to a one length win under Tyler Baze in Thursday’s $58,000 allowance feature at Santa Anita, as the 4-year-old Giant’s Causeway gelding got 6 ½ furlongs on a track labeled wet fast in 1:15.45.Originally scheduled to be run at 6 ½ furlongs down the track’s hillside turf course, significant rains necessitated the switch to the main track, which resulted in three scratches out of the body of the race. The second choice at 5-2 in a field of seven 3-year-olds and up, Cautious Giant paid $7.20, $4.00 and $3.40.Trained by Carla Gaines and owned by Betty and Robert G. Irvin, Cautious Giant cut back in distance off a close third at the level going a flat mile on April 4 and ran as a gelding for the first time on Thursday. In getting his second win from 10 starts, Cautious Giant banked $34,800, increasing his earnings to $99,700.Ridden by Corey Nakatani, Husband’s Folly lagged far back early behind splits of 21.82, 44.37 and 1:08.84, hugged the rail and mounted a serious stretch rally to finish second, 1 ¾ lengths in front of longshot Bam Bam. Off at 14-1, Husband’s Folly paid $9.40 and $6.60.Ridden by Alex Solis, Brazilian-bred Bam Bam eased off the early pace leaving the five furlong pole and rallied five wide turning for home to run third, finishing 2 ¼ lengths in front of early pacesetter Diamond Majesty. Off at 16-1, Bam Bam returned $6.80 to show.First post time on Friday at Santa Anita is at 1 p.m. Admission gates open at 11 a.m.last_img read more

SANTA MONICA STAKES QUOTES – SATURDAY JANUARY 23, 2016

first_imgFERNANDO PEREZ, LOST BUS, WINNER: “She ran well last time but even I didn’t know she was going to run this well in here. I got a clean break, I took her to the lead and she was comfortable the whole time and at the end, she was still trying.“Corey (Nakatani, on Finest City) was pushing me. We were bumping a little bit down the stretch, but not much to be honest. He just had to take the shot to see if he could get the disqualification.“I didn’t even see Mike (Smith, on favored Tara’s Tango) at the wire. I was too busy fighting with Corey and trying to beat him. I needed to get that done first.” NOTES: Winning owner Terry Lovingier resides in Long Beach. JOCKEY QUOTES TERRY LOVINGIER, OWNER, LOST BUS, WINNER: “I’m kinda lost for words. I didn’t expect this and not too many others did either; she was 60-1. We claimed her (for $32,000 three starts back on Nov. 19) because she battled quite a few times with My Fiona (stakes-winning filly owned by Lovingier) when they were both 2-year-olds. I don’t claim that often anymore, but I did claim quite a few horses before I started breeding them.” GARY SHERLOCK, LOST BUS, WINNER: “This race was a Grade I when I won it last time (with Intangaroo in 2008). Lost Bus was pretty much going to run before I learned Sunday Rules wouldn’t be entered, but I was running for third, and it turned out better than that.“There wasn’t a lot of speed in the race, and I told Fernando to go to the front.”Asked about her next race: “She’s a Cal-bred, so there are plenty of options.” MIKE SMITH, TARA’S TANGO, THIRD: “I tried to get her out of there quickly today and we did much better (than usual) but we couldn’t quite keep up with that forty-four pace. I was having to really, really pedal to stay head and head with them and that’s a long way to be on her, that hard, the whole time. I couldn’t keep her in a hard drive.“I thought I could let them go, give her a bit of a breather and then go at them again on the outside and it worked, but, I just didn’t get there in time.“You just try and do the right thing and sometimes when it works, you’re the hero. Sometimes though, if you don’t win, you don’t look so good.” TRAINER QUOTESlast_img read more

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – WEDNESDAY SEPTEMBER 21, 2016

first_imgESPINOZA: CHROME ‘DOING HIS BEST RIGHT NOW’MELATONIN WORKS FOR BREEDERS’ CUP CLASSICBAFFERT MULLS HIS AWESOME AGAIN STARTERSOPTIONS ARE OPEN FOR VERSATILE TARA’S TANGO CALIFORNIA CHROME ‘NEVER BETTER’ FOR AWESOME AGAIN            If anybody knows California Chrome better than trainer Art Sherman and his son and assistant, Alan, it’s Victor Espinoza.The regular pilot of the storybook California-bred, Espinoza has ridden the five-year-old chestnut 17 times, winning 12, including the last five in a row. He will be heavily favored to make it six a week from Saturday, Oct. 1, when he runs in the Awesome Again Stakes, one of five Grade I, “Win and You’re In” Breeders’ Cup Challenge events on the second day of Santa Anita’s 23-day Autumn Meet.Santa Anita hosts the Breeders’ Cup World Championships for an unprecedented ninth time on Nov. 4 and 5.Espinoza says California Chrome is better than ever, but walked the tightrope when asked whether his “Slipped Saddle Saga” in the Dubai World Cup last March 26 or his spectacular, front-running, five-length triumph in the Pacific Classic Aug. 20 was his best race.            “He ran insane in Dubai,” the gregarious and ever-accommodating Espinoza said by phone from New York where he was visiting family. “Going a mile and a quarter on a track a world away with the saddle slipping and running the way he did was amazing.“The saddle slipped all the way to his hind end. The girth was fully up on his hips. It was tough for me to handle, but we got it done (winning comfortably by nearly four lengths).“I don’t know whether the Dubai race or the Pacific Classic was his best, but I’m confident of one thing: He’s doing his best right now.“I watched a video of his workout last Saturday and he looked great. He’s absolutely better than he’s ever been. I’ve never seen him doing as well as he’s doing now, except perhaps in his three-year-old season when he was on his way to the Kentucky Derby.”Be that as it may, it’s a no-brainer that Espinoza and Chrome are on their way to the Hall of Fame. And lest we forget, it was just 15 months ago that Espinoza guided American Pharoah to the first Triple Crown sweep in 37 years.Perhaps only one question lingers: will their selections be unanimous?The Awesome Again shares the marquee with the Zenyatta Stakes for fillies and mares, three and up, expected to lure three-time champion Beholder and Stellar Wind, the champion three-year-old filly of 2015 who upset three-time Eclipse Award winner Beholder in the Grade I Clement L. Hirsch Stakes at Del Mar July 30.Supplementing the headline events will be the FrontRunner Stakes for two-year-olds at 1 1/16 miles; the Chandelier Stakes for two-year-old fillies at 1 1/16 miles; and the Rodeo Drive Stakes for fillies and mares, three and up, at 1 ¼ miles on Santa Anita’s renovated turf course.Victory gives the winning horse in each race a fees paid berth to its respective Breeders’ Cup event.On Saturday, Oct. 8, the Grade I Santa Anita Sprint Championship for three year olds and up at six furlongs will serve as a springboard to the $1.5 million TwinSpires Breeders’ Cup Sprint on Nov. 5.Santa Anita’s 23-day Autumn Meet starts on Friday, Sept. 30 and concludes on Sunday, Nov. 6. Friday’s feature is the $100,000, Grade III Eddie D., named for one of the game’s greatest riders, Hall of Fame member Eddie Delahoussaye who celebrates his 65th birthday today. The ever-popular Cajun will be on hand to present a trophy to the winning connections.Entries for next Saturday and Sunday’s races will be taken a week from today, Wednesday, Sept. 28. Friday’s opening day card will be drawn on Tuesday, Sept. 27. First post time opening day will be 1 p.m. First post Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 1 and 2, will be 12:30 p.m. ZENYATTA OR SPINSTER FOR TARA’S TANGOTara’s Tango, winner of the Grade I Santa Margarita at a mile and an eighth last March, is nominated to the Grade I, $300,000 Zenyatta Stakes at the same distance here on Oct. 1 but could wind up in the Grade I, $500,000 Juddmonte Spinster Stakes at Keeneland on Oct. 9.The Spinster also is at 1 1/8 miles.“She’s going to run in one or the other,” Dan Ward, assistant to Jerry Hollendorfer, said Wednesday morning. “It would be easier for her to run in the Spinster than it would against Beholder and Stellar Wind here, that’s for sure, so it’s a possibility even though she’d have to ship. She’s training well.”Tara’s Tango, a four-year-old gray daughter of Unbridled’s Song, is owned and was bred by Stonestreet Stables, LLC, which also owns Cavorting, winner of the Grade I Personal Ensign and the Grade I Ogden Phipps.            Trained by Kiaran McLaughlin, Cavorting is ticketed for the Longines Breeders’ Cup Distaff at Santa Anita on Nov. 4. Depending on how she performs in her next start, Tara’s Tango could go there also, although the Breeders’ Cup Filly & Mare Sprint at seven furlongs Nov. 5 could be an option should Stonestreet opt not to run both fillies in the Distaff.Tara’s Tango has fared well sprinting, having won the Grade III Rancho Bernardo Handicap at 6 ½ furlongs Aug. 17 at Del Mar and finishing third by a neck in the Grade II Santa Monica Stakes at seven furlongs last Jan. 23. MELATONIN WORKS TOWARDS BC CLASSIC            Santa Anita Handicap winner Melatonin worked five furlongs Wednesday morning in 1:02 as he prepares for the $6 million Breeders’ Cup Classic at Santa Anita Nov. 5. His fractional times were 23.80, 37 flat and 50 flat.“He did it nice and easy,” trainer David Hofmans said. “We’re pointing to the Breeders’ Cup Classic. He seems to like the track. It’s in very good condition.“We backed off training over the main track at Del Mar, and although we jogged him and galloped him on the training track, I lost enough time where I couldn’t make the Awesome Again. He likes time between his races but this is a lot of time and the Awesome Again is a tough spot.”Melatonin last raced on June 25, winning the Grade I Gold Cup at Santa Anita earning a fees paid berth to the Classic valued at $150,000.Meanwhile, Bob Baffert, just returned from the Keeneland Sales, was non-committal on which, if any, of the five horses he has nominated to the Awesome Again would compete in the race, although Cupid is out as he was en route to Parx for Saturday’s Pennsylvania Derby.That leaves American Freedom, Arrogate, Dortmund and Hoppertunity.“It’s too early to make any calls on the race yet,” Baffert said Wednesday morning after watching Chandelier Stakes candidate American Cleopatra work five furlongs in company with Noted and Quoted. Each was timed in 59.60. “I just got back; I’ve got to watch them train.”Win the Space, who was “pulled up and walked off” when last of nine behind California Chrome in the Pacific Classic, will come back in the Awesome Again.“I guess it wasn’t his day,” trainer George Papaprodromou said of the four-year-old Pulpit colt who threw a scare into Melatonin in the Gold Cup when he finished second at 24-1 under Gary Stevens.“Maybe it was the track (at Del Mar), I don’t know. The horse came back fine. It was one of those things. He didn’t fire that day.”Papaprodromou said Stevens would be back aboard for the Awesome Again. FINISH LINES: Santa Anita will offer large guaranteed pools every day this meet, starting Saturday, Oct. 1 with $750,000 on the Late Pick 4 and a $100,000 Pick 6. Thursdays, Fridays and on holiday Mondays the Late pick 4 will be guaranteed at $300,000, and $500,000 on Saturdays and Sundays after Oct. 1, when the $100,000 Pick 6 will remain in play . . . Multiple graded turf stakes winner Om, a fast-closing second to front-running winner Midnight Storm in the Del Mar Derby, is ticketed for the Grade II City of Hope Mile on Saturday, Oct. 8, with the $2 million Breeders’ Cup Mile Nov. 5 his ultimate goal. “I’m real happy with him,” trainer Dan Hendricks said. Stakes-winning turf specialist Obviously, also set for the City of Hope, worked six furlongs on the training track in 1:12.20 Monday for Phil D’Amato, who also sent Shoemaker Mile winner Midnight Storm five furlongs on the same surface in 1:01. The leading trainer at Santa Anita’s Summer Meet and the recent Del Mar session plans to bring the latter up to the Breeders’ Cup Mile on works. “Things are going well,” D’Amato said. “I can’t wait to debut a lot of two-year-olds here at Santa Anita.” . . . The California Horse Racing Board will hold its regular monthly meeting 9:30 a.m. tomorrow at Los Alamitos. The public is encouraged to attend. An audio-only webcast of the meeting can be heard through a link on the CHRB website (webcast) . . . Agent Tony Matos has Martin Garcia booked on War Envy in the Eddie D. Stakes for trainer Shelbe Ruis.last_img read more